Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village

Zhaoxing: Updated travel info and new (old) photos.

Zhaoxing 肇兴镇 (2003)

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village. Having a chat
Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village. Having a chat

Zhaoxing, the ultimate Dong village is must for anyone interested in Dong minority architecture and culture. And even if Zhaoxing has become somewhat tamer and more touristy since we visited, it is still a gem you cannot miss if you are travelling in these parts.

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village.
Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village. Having a chat

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village: About the black and white photos

These are real black and white photos taken using a cheap black and white film i picked up in Beijing. The colour photos are from later in the day and the following day after changing rolls.

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village. All aboard!
Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village. All aboard!

The ride from Songjiang to Zhaoxing takes around 5 hours: first the road hugs the shores of a broad river with quite a bit of river traffic, before becoming an unsealed road that winds its way up and down over the mountains (see update at the end of the article). There are ample vistas of shiny, undulating rice terraces, narrow valleys, distant drum towers and covered bridges.

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village in black and white
Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village in black and white

Zhaoxing is one of the few towns in China whose beauty you will never forget. It’s a traditional Dong town, entirely built of wood, with 5 drum towers, an equal number of theatre stages and arcaded streets.

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village; the Drum Tower
Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village; the Drum Tower

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village

Zhaoxing dog on balcony
Zhaoxing dog on balcony

In 2003 the town remained completely intact and authentic; there wasn’t a white tile building in sight (apart from the local school on the edge of down), nor had they carried out any of those tacky reforms aimed at the tourist trade. There were just a couple of guesthouses, small restaurants and one or two tasteful shops, selling antiques, rustic farm implements and ethnic clothes.

River Scene Zhaoxing
River Scene Zhaoxing

The town is extremely compact with a clearly defined beginning and end. The main street is bustling with vegetable and meat stalls and there are chillies everywhere; fresh chillies, chillies being dried, pounded, ground or preserved.

Grinding Thunder Mountain Chillies in Zhaoxing Guizhou
Grinding Thunder Mountain Chillies in Zhaoxing Guizhou

Update 1: Thunder Mountain chillies

Since our vist to Zhaoxing I have become a great fan of chillies and cultivating them too. Looking again at these photos I am more and more convinced that the chillies they are selling are the famous Thunder Mountain (Leigong Shan) Chillies grown in Guizhou. They are said to be the longest chillies in the world and their seeds are sought after by chilli freaks like me. My only doubt is that they look a little thicker than Thunder Mountain Chillies,

Thunder Mountain chillies on sale in Zhaoxing Guizhou
Thunder Mountain Chillies on sale in Zhaoxing Guizhou

There is a busy traffic of carts, pulled by shiny, well looked-after little horses, bringing in fresh produce. Villagers from the surrounding countryside are ferried into town in jam-packed minivans, or piled high on pick-up trucks.

Zhaoxing travel connections 200
Zhaoxing travel connections 2003

Set back from the main street there are several squares, some centred  around imposing and elaborately decorated Drum Towers, others set by small theatre stages where local opera performances still take place, especially in June.

Zhaoxing theatre and Dong lady with basket
Zhaoxing theatre and Dong lady with basket

Zhaoxing: The Ultimate Dong Village: Chilling Out

Locals, mostly elderly people and grannies looking after babies, occupy the benches underneath the Drum Towers, or lining the streets, and while away the hours.

Chilling out in Zhaoxing
Chilling out in Zhaoxing

One of the funniest sights we saw, was an old man un-harnessing his horse in front of his little house, unlocking the door and walking straight in … with the animal!

Siesta time in Zhaoxing
Siesta time in Zhaoxing

As for its surroundings, Zhaoxing is set in a deep valley, enclosed by rice terraces and forests on all sides.

Dinner passing by in zhaoxing
Dinner passing by in zhaoxing

As in many parts of Guizhou, especially in summer, the sky is often dull and grey, which lends a slightly gloomy atmosphere to the countryside. Yet, occasionally a ray of sunlight breaks through the clouds and ignites the rice paddies into a blaze of bright green, completely transforming the ambience.

Stunning Zhaoxing
Stunning Zhaoxing

Climbing up the rice terraces behind Zhaoxing, you will be rewarded with marvellous views over the whole town. This way, you’ll be able to fully appreciate its completeness and uniqueness.

Fiddler on the roof Zhaoxing
Fiddler on the roof Zhaoxing

For further exploration, there are many paths leading out of the village towards other, smaller, but equally beautiful Dong settlements such as Jitang and Tang’an. The local guesthouses can provide maps and recommendations for hikes to surrounding villages.

Zhaoxing practicalities:

Wind and Rain bridge Zhaoxing
Wind and Rain bridge Zhaoxing

Accommodation and Food:

We stayed at Lulu’s Homestay, a small hostel run by a friend of the owner of the Chengyang Bridge National Hostel and located right behind one of the Drum Towers. He must have rung ahead, as the daughter of Mr Lu, who spoke a little English, was waiting for us at the bus stop when we arrived.

Zhaoxing Map of walks and other Dong Villages given to us by Mr Lu
Zhaoxing Map of walks and other Dong Villages Given to us by Mr Lu

Rooms in the three-storey wooden house are clean and simple, with a shared bathroom, and internet access is available. The family also made very good food, with plenty of fresh vegetables and large portions. They were in the process of building a much larger wooden guesthouse, just a few doors away. 

Breakfast in Zhaoxing
Breakfast in Zhaoxing

At the time there was another, more upmarket hostel, with a restaurant and a shop selling ethnic clothing and souvenirs, near the main street.

Onward Travel & Update:

Local Transport Zhaoxing
Local Transport Zhaoxing

In 2003 we continued from Zhaoxing to Kaili. To do this we took an early morning bus, at approximately 7 o’clock to Liping (one to one and a half hours) and then changed buses for Kaili, which took another eight hours.

Beautiful Zhaoxing
Beautiful Zhaoxing

However, we could have interrupted our journey in Rongjiang – a town we finally ended up visiting this summer – in 2007.

Travel Update

Old Zhaoxing Residents under the main drum tower
Old Zhaoxing Residents under the main drum tower

The high-speed train that runs between Guangzhou and Guiyang makes getting to Zhaoxing faster. The closest stops are Sanjiang or Congjiang. Congjiang station is much closer and is less than 10 kms way from Zhaoxing. Regular buses connect Conjiang Railway Staion to Zhaoxing and cost around 2 Yuan.

Downtown Zhaoxing
Downtown Zhaoxing

From Sanjiang there is a toll road motorway that reduces travelling time to around one and a half hours. Buses may take longer as the usually take the old road to stop at other towns along the way. I fondly remmeber the 5 hour ride in 2003 as it passed through some beautiful river and mountain scenery.

Zhaoxing overview
Zhaoxing overview

BACK TO GUIZHOU PROVINCE

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

Yangmei : Guanxi’s Ancient Banana Town
Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Province
Yangmei: So near yet so far!
Yangmei

Yangmei: So near yet so far! Only 30 kilometres separate the modern, green and dynamic city of Nanning, capital of the Zhuang Autonomous Province of Guangxi, from the ancient village of Yangmei. However, the differences between the two places are so great that they might as well exist on other planets.

The smart motorway leaving Nanning runs out after about 10 kilometres, when the buses takes an abrupt turn into a country lane. The rest of the journey takes an incredible 2 hours, as the bus passes through local markets, gets stuck in a traffic jam of three-wheeled motorcycle rickshaws, makes a slow river crossing on a rusty ferry and stops at every village on the way, delivering passengers and parcels.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

Yangmei: So near yet so far! It takes a long time to get there

The scenery is rural and pretty. Most of the people in this area belong to the ethnic group of the Zhuang, which is virtually indistinguishable from the majority Han Chinese, both in physical appearance and dress. They earn their livelihood from the cultivation of sugar cane and bananas. You can see ample evidence of the latter as the bus makes its way through the endless plantations that stretch along both sides of the road for as far as the eye can see.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

Yangmei might have been like many other rural villages in China, abandoned by its population, heading for the cities, and fallen into oblivion. Fortunately, Yangmei has been saved by its incredible collection of Ming and Qing courtyard houses in grey brick and its fantastic setting on the bend of a river, amidst sub-tropical countryside.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!
Yangmei Venacular Building

What is even more incredible is that so far it hasn’t been converted into some kind of Qing-Ming dynasty theme park, like so many other, once beautiful and charming villages in China.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

Yangmei: So near yet so far! Authentic Character

For the moment, the village preserves its authentic character; local people still live in many of the buildings you can visit and the majority of the population is involved in agriculture, rather than the tourist trade.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

A couple of grannies selling hand-sewn miniature shoes and stuffed, cloth butterflies and a couple of open-air restaurants by the river, seem to be Yangmei’s main concession to tourism.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

The village has no great sights as such. It is just a nice place to wander around for a few hours and soak up a bit of the old China. Wooden signs show visitors where to find the old Ming and Qing dynasty mansions, tucked away down narrow alleys, or set around lotus ponds. Many of Yangmei’s early residents came from Shandong Province which is why a lot of the old Ming and Qing buildings were built in the sturdy northern style.

Yangmei: So near yet so far!

Local people, most of them advanced in years, congregate in the courtyards or the village’s small flagstone squares, where they smoke pipes and play Mah-jong. Some try their luck at fishing in the ponds.

Yangmei Temple

Apart from the mansions, there are also a number of temples scattered around, most of them undergoing serious restoration, as they were badly damaged during the Cultural Revolution.

Imortalizing our names in Yangmei
Imortalizing our names in Yangmei

Being Imortalized in Yangmei

The Confucian temple, just outside the village, seems to have discovered a novel way of collecting funds for its renovation, by offering visitors the opportunity to be immortalized on its memorial plaques.

Imortalizing our names in Yangmei
Imortalizing our names in Yangmei

For ten Yuan you can have your name and country engraved in a slab of black marble by a venerable old grandfather in a blue peasant jacket, Mao style, and thick spectacles. These plaques are then used to cover the walls and doors of the temple, providing a kind of stone visitors’ book.

Crazy Statues in Yangmei's Temple

After a few hours of wandering around, one tends to get a bit peckish. Near the river there are a couple of family-run restaurants that specialize in local products.

Crazy Statues in Yangmei's Temple
Crazy Statues in Yangmei’s Temple

Yangmei: So near yet so far! What to eat

River fish is the favourite and can be cooked in a number of ways. The tasty food, cold beer and shady riverside location all make for a pleasant way to while away the rest of the afternoon, until it’s time to catch the last bus back to Nanning at four o’clock sharp.

Margie in Yangmei

If you like bananas, you should do what all visitors from Nanning do and stock up on a couple of bunches! Another famous local product are the pots of homemade pickles that can turn the ride back to Nanning into a rather pungent experience.

Bananas Yangmei

Coming and Going:

Buses for Yangmei leave from an obscure small local bus station in Nanning, about ten minutes from the train station. Walk down Chaoyang Lu, go past the Yinhe Hotel, go down one block, take the first street on the right and then turn right again, into Huaqiang Lu: the bus station is next to house number 198. Buses seemed to leave every 1½ hours, with the first one at 8.50. The last bus back to Nanning is at 16.00. Count on about two hours for the 30km trip.

Adam in Yangmei

Places to stay:

We saw at least one basic local guesthouse that would probably be okay for a night. Moreover, a new small hotel, in keeping with the local style of architecture, looked as if it would be opening soon.

Places to eat:

The restaurants by the river offer the best eating possibilities. Good fresh fish, taken straight from the tanks, is the best choice. Meat eaters might like to try the local chickens, all of which looked pretty big and healthy.

Back to Guangxi Province

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake is located around 25 kilometres to the north of Kanding, in China’s Sichuan Province. At a height of 3700 metres above sea level it is actually one of the highest lakes in this part of Sichuan. Mugecuo is a really a series of small lakes, that has become collectively known as Mugecuo.

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake

The road up to the lake is beautiful, especially the final part that follows a gushing river. One spot on the way up marks the scenic place that inspired the writing of the famous Kangding Love Song.

Gnarled Trees Mugecuo Lake

Mysterious Mugecuo Lake: Enshrouded in Mist

Once you enter the lake area you find yourself in a mystic and magical landscape that is more often than not, enshrouded in a deep impenetrable mist. The lakes are encircled by pine forests, huge cedars and ancient gnarled trees, with ´hairy´ threads of vegetation hanging off them. Furthermore, there are forests of rhododendron trees  everywhere.

Hanging vegetation Mugecuo Lake

The day we visited a swirling mist had surged up from the lake causing the water to take on a deep dark green menacing look.  Occasionally the mist would break, and for a few seconds the lake became a placid and friendly blue green.

As you hike around the lake, you’ll bump in to nomads on horse back. Some of these nomads set up temporary settlements near the lakes with some refreshments tents during in the high season.

Nomads Mugecuo Lake
Nomads Mugecuo Lake

Coming and Going:

There is no public transport; you can hire a taxi from Kanding for about 200 Yuan. Make sure you are prepared for abrupt changes in temperature and weather; it can snow here even in summer.

Hairy Trees

Our driver was a rather drunk- jolly fellow and nearly killed us all when returning to Kangding. We forgave him a as nothing happened.

Beautiful Mugecuo Lake

These days Mugecuo lake is more touristy than when we visited. However, most day tippers stick to the entrance area. There are plenty of hiking opportunities and if you take your own equippment and just keep going , you’ll end up on the Taggong Grasslands. Be aware, the mist and the thick forest make getting lost a real possibilitity!

Magic Mugecuo lake

A trip to Wase Market

Wase Market 挖色 Lake Erhai

Singing ladies Wase Market
Singing ladies Wase Market

A trip to Wase Market held every 5 days is a fantastic off the beaten track excursion if you are passing through Erhai Hu Yunnan Province.

A trip to Wase Market Melon seller
Melon seller Wase Market

Getting to Wase from Xizhou 喜洲

Getting to the Saturday market at the Bai village of Wase wasn’t as easy as we had first thought. Most people in Xizhou , the town on the opposite side of Lake Erhai where we were staying, had told us that there was no ferry and that we should try to get to Wase by hopping on and off the numerous buses that go around the lake.

Jin Hua Restaurant Xizhou
Jin Hua Restaurant Xizhou

To make matters more complicated, none of the locals agreed as to whether it was better to go round the North, or the South way. Only the owner of the Golden Flower Restaurant on the central square of Xizhou was convinced that there was a boat.

On Saturday we got up early and tried our luck on the road, waving our arms energetically at any north-bound bus, but to no avail. In desperation, we tried asking about the ferry again. The first man I approached categorically denied the existence of any boat.

Fisherman Lake Erhai

A second man was equally adamant that there was indeed a boat, and he was backed up by a number of local Bai women, who happened to be passing by. According to them, there was a ferry leaving at 9.00 from the pier at the village we thought was called Huoyijia, about 2 kilometres away. I think now the village was called Jiangshan Cun.

The pier at the village of Huoyijia or Jiangshan Cun?
The pier at the village of Huoyijia or Jiangshan Cun?

“How do we get there?” I asked with a certain urgency, because it was by now 8.50! They called over a young man on a motorbike with a trailer behind. We quickly agreed on a price and hopped on.

Scenery Near Huoyijia or jiangshan cun
Scenery Near Huoyijia or Jiangshan Cun

A trip to Wase Market: Missing the Boat

Unfortunately, the dirt road from Xizhou to Huoyijia/Jiangshan Cun is nothing but a series of bumps and craters; in short, more dirt than road. In order for the trailer not to overturn, the driver had to engage in endless manoeuvres, which reduced our speed to a snail’s pace. 

Scenery Near Huoyijia or jiangshan cun
Scenery Near Huoyijia or Jiangshan cun

Soon we found ourselves being overtaken by smiling children and cheerful old ladies on bicycles.  If there was such a thing as a boat, only unpunctuality would help us catch it!

Visitors to Wase Market

At 9.07 our trailer finally made it to the quay, where we could only stand and stare in disillusionment and disbelief at the ferry, fading away into the distance across the lake. It was a classical example of the implacable working of ‘Murphy’s Law’! It would eventually take a further two hours, two buses and a taxi, following the southern route this time, to get to Wase, and its lively and interesting Saturday Market.

A trip to Wase Market

A trip to Wase Market: Brushing Shoulders with the Bai

A trip to Wase Market

We were dropped off at the top of a narrow alley, leading into town. The alley was chock-a-block with fruit sellers and donkey parking lots, with piles of wooden yokes and saddles stacked up breast high.

A trip to Wase Market

When we managed to shoulder our way through the crowds, we emerged onto a large square, near the boat pier, with hundreds of stalls, mostly selling an amazing array of fruit and vegetables. The only souvenir stalls in town, selling batiks and ethnic embroidery, are located here as well.

The square is a buzzing, but friendly hive of activity, with hundreds of colourful Bai women pushing  and shoving backwards and forwards, using the huge wicker baskets they carry on their backs as buffers.

A trip to Wase Market: A lot of Haggling

Cries of haggling fill the air as produce is picked up, inspected and either exchanged for money, or tossed contemptuously back onto the pile it came from.

As usual, men seem to be in short supply; they are mainly found peacefully smoking a pipe, or playing cards in one of the packed restaurants on either side of the square.

Packed Restaurants Wase
Packed Restaurants Wase

Moving on from the square, the market continues down the main street for at least another kilometre. Here you can stock up on household goods, such as plastic buckets, scoops and ladles, iron woks and other cooking pots and pans, wicker baskets, brooms, colourful balls of wool and lengths of cloth. 

Checking Bank Notes ar Wase
Checking Bank Notes ar Wase

More exotic items include the embroidered parts of headdresses and belts, embroidered shoes, silver jewellery, or even wedding dresses.

Broom Sellers A trip to Wase Market

For all the variety, there was one item we missed at Wase market: the large, odd shaped bamboo fish traps that abounded around Lake Erhai, fifteen years ago. Perhaps they have been replaced by the more modern nylon fishing nets that we often saw stretched out along the lake shore.

Bai traders A trip to Wase Market

Apart from the stalls, there is the usual varied collection of street artisans and other ‘professionals’, such as dentists, hairdressers and ear cleaners. Eventually the market finishes at a small animal market where chickens and pigs come to meet their end.

Chicken for sale A trip to Wase Market

Ghost shopping.

What is curious about this market is that it not only provides for the living, but for the ghosts of the dead as well. There are several stalls selling paper clothes, shoes, houses and other luxury articles; all presumably meant to make ‘life’ in the after world more pleasant. One stall in particular was selling the most exquisite miniature paper shoes, and the Bai ladies were buying them by the bag-full.

Singing ladies Wase Market

At one point we were drawn away from the main street by a large group of middle-aged and ancient ladies, sitting on wooden benches, singing and tapping small wooden instruments.

Singing ladies Wase Market

To one side, there were several other grannies, busy folding and burning coloured pieces of paper. When we asked them what they were doing they explained that they were singing, or praying, to the dead and burning prayers. It was apparently the auspicious and appropriate time of the month for doing this.

Singing ladies Wase Market

Practicalities:

Location: Wase is situated on the eastern side of Lake Erhai, about 350 kilometres north of Kunming, the capital of Yunnan. Apparently, the Wase market used to take place every 5 days, but it is now held on Saturday mornings, and runs well into the afternoon.

A trip to Wase Market buying eggplants
Buying Eggplants

Besides the obvious attraction of the market, the town is full of wonderful traditional Bai homes and mansions, characterised by their sturdy adobe walls and painted doorways.

Bai Architecture Wase
Bai Architecture Wase

There are numerous other markets in the various Bai villages around Lake Erhai. The most famous and popular is the Monday market at Shaping, about 33 kilometres from Dali.

Shaping Market 1991
Shaping Market 1991

Even in January 1991, Shaping market was already pretty touristy, though interesting. These days, Wase’s Saturday market hasn’t been swamped by the tourist hordes from Dali yet.

Coming and Going

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By Boat:

we can personally vouch for the existence of a boat that leaves from the pier at Huoyijia village / jiangshan Cun, on the western side of the lake near Xizhou, at 9.00 on Saturdays (at least in 2006 it existed). According to locals, it departs again sometime between 12.00 and 14.00.

Leaving Wase Market
Leaving Wase Market

People in Wase were far from unanimous in confirming that the last boat returns to Huoyijia / Jiangshan Cun at 17.00. We didn’t stay around to risk it, as the last bus back to Xiaguan is at 16.00. If you are staying in Dali, you might be able to organise a boat over (we saw one tour group getting to Wase that way), but expect to pay through the nose, unless you are in a large group.

By Bus:

Putuo Dao and Putuo Dao si
Putuo Dao and Putuo Dao si

if you are staying in Xizhou (far more recommendable than Dali), or anywhere else around the Lake,  you can get to Wase by bus in both directions, though locals advised us to take the southern route via Xiaguan rather than the northern route via Jiangwei, because buses are more frequent.

Amazing Courtyard Wase
Amazing Courtyard Wase

The trick is to take any passing bus to Xiaguan, where you will be dropped off at the western bus station. From there, you can take a local bus or taxi (6 Yuan) to the eastern bus station, from where there are regular departures to towns and villages along the eastern part of the Lake, including Wase.

The Journey from Xiaguan to Wase takes about an hour and a half. The new road opened in 2006 means that from Haidong onwards, the bus skirts the lake shore all the way, thus avoiding the laborious inland route that climbed over and around the mountains.

Basket Sellers Wase
Basket Sellers Wase

As a result, the views of Lake Erhai and the Island of Putuo Dao from the bus are excellent. The last bus back to Xiaguan is at 16.00. From Xiaguan to Xizhou there are buses until at least 19.00.

Shopper in Wase
Shopper in Wase

Places to Eat:

After a couple of hours of wandering around, its worth stopping for lunch in one of the restaurants around the main square.

Informal But delicoius lunch in Wase
Informal But delicoius lunch in Wase

The local fish from the lake is particularly good, especially the deep-fried fish strips in batter. Some of the restaurants are quite used to dealing with foreigners, as they are frequented by tour groups, boated over in style from Dali.

Places to stay:

There is apparently a government guesthouse in Wase, though we are not sure whether we saw it. The courtyard restaurant on the left-hand side of the square (facing the water), which is where we ate, may have doubled up as a guesthouse, but we are not sure.

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege
Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege is not the only reason to come to this remote area of China’s Sichuan Province. There are plenty of other things to see and do. It is however, the end of the road for non- Chinese travellers. Tibet is so close but yet so far.

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege
Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

A bit of a Shock on arrival

The town, we must admit, came as a bit of a shock at first. Having travelled so far, to such a remote place, only to find ourselves in yet another dusty white-tile frontier town, full of hooting traffic, smoking exhausts and blaring radios was not quite what we were expecting.

Young Monks at the Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Young Monks at the Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The only hotel in town had even incorporated a karaoke cum disco in its rapidly deteriorating “new wing”: even though this part of the hotel was only one or two years old, there were cigarette burns in the carpets, peanut shells and pips littering the floor, and stains everywhere.

Monks houses Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Monks houses Dege

It wasn’t until the next day that we discovered the delights of the small old town, which houses a number of interesting and beautiful temples, converting Dege in a vibrant place, dominated by the wine-red robes of the monks and the exotic attire of the numerous pilgrims, circumambulating the temples and shrines.

Monks Dege
Monks Dege

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege

The jewel in Dege’s crown is undoubtedly the Bakong Scripture Printing Lamasery. 

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege
Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

This monastery, whose printing press was built in 1729 and is still operative,  holds an important part of Tibet’s history and heritage. The building itself is quite imposing; its walls are painted brick-red, with a decorative rim of dark-brown twigs pressed into one solid layer, while the flat roofs are topped by golden birds, bells and turrets.

Dege Monks
Monks Dege

Groups of wild-looking pilgrims with unkempt long braids and wrapped in Tibetan greatcoats move clockwise around the outside.

Making printing Paper Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Making Printing Paper

Everything Handmade

Nearby, groups of monastery workers, most of them women, their index fingers protected by leather thimbles, are busy making wood pulp from thin strips of shredded wood, while others are wetting finished sheets of paper to soften them and prepare them for use.

Making printing Paper Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Making printing Paper Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

Inside the print, nothing much has changed for centuries: there are still over a 100 workers, more than 210,000 stored wood-block printing plates, and no mechanization to speak of; so far the monastery has even avoided electricity for fear of fire.

Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The wood-block texts

The wood-block texts in the library cum storeroom include works on astronomy, Tibetan traditional medicine, geography and music, as well as important treatises on Buddhism. The most valuable item in the collection consists of 555 blocks, detailing the history of Buddhism in India, in Hindu, Urdu and Tibetan.

Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The oldest blocks are carved into precious woods that are no longer available. In the past, carvers were only  allowed to produce one line of text a day, for reasons of clarity.

Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

At the end of the day, their work would be remunerated by putting gold dust on the blocks and then wiping it off. All the gold that remained in the openings, lines and spaces was for the carvers. Obviously, the deeper and clearer they carved, the more they would earn.

Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The printers

The printers, who are mostly young men, work in groups of three, moving like well-oiled cogs in a machine: one of them places the paper in the wooden contraption used for printing and holds it in place, the other one inks the wood-block and presses it down on the paper.

Making Paper Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Making Paper Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The third one is in charge of fetching the correct blocks, collecting and sorting the finished prints, as well as plying the printers with tea. The printed text appears quickly, at a speed of about one page every four seconds.

Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Print Dying Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

However, given that many of the sacred texts, such as the Tengzur, a 46,521 page collection of 14th-century scholastic commentaries on Buddhism, are extremely long, it can take one team of workers roughly a month to produce just one copy.

Painted column  Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Painted column Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

Bakong Tibetan Scripture Printing Lamasery Dege

In the open-air courtyards, which are surrounded by beautifully painted columns and galleries, older men are busy washing the ink off used printing blocks, mixing paint, or proofreading and checking finished texts and storing them away.

Just by being there and observing the process, you can appreciate how fragile Tibet’s heritage is. That the monastery survived the ravages of the cultural revolution is a miracle in itself!

monk Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

Moreover, the fact that the whole interior of  the building,  the library and its irreplaceable collection of printing blocks are made of wood, make it extremely vulnerable to fire. One careless mistake or loose spark and it could all go up in smoke.

Pilgrims Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Pilgrims Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

The vulnerability of the monastery is one of the reasons you can only visit by guided tour. Unfortunately, most of the guides are elderly men with only the most rudimentary knowledge of Mandarin, who will herd you through far too quickly.

Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Winnie Bini margie and guide

An Amazing Guide

However, there are exceptions. We were extremely lucky to be guided by a lovely young Tibetan girl who had actually studied Tibetan culture at a Minorities University and who was completely dedicated to her work.

golden statue
Golden Statue

She explained that most of the print workers are locals who spend their whole life there, starting with the physically taxing work of printing itself, and gradually moving on to lighter tasks as they get older.

Young Kid Dege
Young Kid Dege

They all need to be literate, up to an extent, in order to carry out their tasks well. In winter, when work at the print comes to a standstill, due to the bitter cold which freezes the ink, and makes the printers’ hands clumsy, many of them spend time at their family farms.

Young Kids Dege
Young Kids Dege

We spent over two hours with her, eventually going up to the top floor where a few ancient monks were making coloured picture prints on cloth and valuable parchment, of which we purchased several, and finally climbing onto the roof, from where there are splendid views over the town. Printing blocks that have been washed are covered in yak butter and laid out to dry here.

Roof top view Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege
Roof top view

Other Monasteries in Dege

Just beyond the Bakong monastery, there are several other lamaseries that are well worth exploring: there are temples, residential blocks set in flower gardens, communal kitchens and primitive outdoor latrines. Groups of monks in flowing robes and child novices in yellow tunics and trousers move between the buildings.

Beautiful Monastery Dege
Beautiful Monastery dege

At mealtimes you can see them with their bowls and utensils in hand, lining up at the kitchens or dining halls. Overall, they are extremely friendly and welcoming and don’t seem to mind posing for the odd photo, as long as you don’t overdo it.

Stunning Tapesteries Dege
Stunning interior Bakong Tibetan Printing Monastery Dege

Dege Ganchen Baden Lundru Ding Temple

One of the monasteries, the Dege Ganchen Baden Lundru Ding Temple (though this seems to be just one of many names given to it), has a particularly imposing main hall with tall pillars, colourful wall hangings and thankas, big painted drums and large but serene statues of the Buddha.

Farm girl Dege
Farm girl Dege

Where the monastic town ends, an idyllic rustic village takes over, with Tibetan farmsteads, haystacks and vegetable patches. Beyond that, fertile fields, small streams and an endless expanse of countryside.

Dege vernacular houses
Dege vernacular houses

Dege Practicalities:

Watching you watching me Dege
Watching you watching me Dege

Accommodation:

At the time of writing, the best hotel in town was the “Que Er Shan”, opposite the “Dege Binguan” and run by the same management. In the “Dege Binguan”, double rooms are only Yuan 50, with pay-showers outside, while the “Que Er Shan” charges Yuan 180, no haggling admitted. Despite the slightly run-down feel of the hotel, rooms are quite large and bright, beds are comfy and the showers are piping hot at night. Just make sure your room isn’t too close to the Karaoke.

Food:

Monks going to their Canteen
Monks going to their Canteen

There are plenty of small, hole-in-the-wall type eateries in town, some of the best run by Han-Chinese and specialising in Sichuan food. Up on a sloping street, just above the hotel, is the “Rhong Zhong Bros Restaurant”, run by a nice young couple from Chengdu; its specialty are potato pancakes and they have a basic menu in English. Other options include Tibetan and Muslim food.

Farms dege
Farms Dege

Communications:

Dege even boasts an upstairs Internet café, on the main street leading to the Bakong monastery, on the left-hand side as you are heading towards the monastery, which is popular with the younger generation. Keep your eyes open for pickpockets though.

Excursions:

The spectacular and remote Palpung Monastery (click here)

Clapped out Jeep Palpung Monastery
Clapped out Jeep

The manager of the “Que Er Shan” can help you to rent vehicles for excursions further afield. We paid Yuan 450 for an old jeep, plus driver for the day. A  much more comfortable brand-new Mitsubishi would have cost us Yuan 1,000. In retrospect, given the state of the roads, plus the state of our backsides after the ride, the Mitsubishi would have been worth it.

View From Palpung Monastery
View From Palpung Monastery

Transport:

Bus Crossing the Chola Pass
Bus Crossing the Chola Pass

The Dege bus station  is nothing like its Ganzi counterpart. Every time we tried to buy tickets, we had found it closed. Eventually, we asked the hotel manager  of the “Que Er Shan” to book the tickets for us. Daily buses for Ganzi leave around 7 o’clock in the morning, and they are mostly old beasts. Make sure you have a reserved seat as the bus does fill up.

After Dege:

Sichuan Tibet border crossing
Sichuan Tibet border crossing

There is a daily bus to Chamdo in Tibet 7.00  but as the Tibetan border is still closed to individual travellers, your options for continuing your journey are the following:

To Baiyu 白玉

Tibet on the otherside of the Jinsha River
Tibet on the otherside of the Jinsha River

If you want to avoid risking the Chola Pass for a second time,you can hire a vehicle or share a mini bus from Dege to the Monastery town of Baiyu. The road follows the Jinsha Rvier with Tibet proper on the other side. The must see sight here is the Pelyul Gompa 白玉寺 (Baiyu Si) which is also a Tibetan printing monastery.

Palpung Monastery
Palpung Monastery

In Baiyu there is accommodation, food, and onward travel to Ganzi. If you set out early enough with your own transport (jeep), you can take in the spectacular and remote Palpung Monastery (click here).

Jinsha River seperating Sichuan from Tibet
Jinsha River seperating Sichuan from Tibet

Backtrack

Back over the Chola Pass
Back over the Chola Pass
  • You can backtrack to Ganzi and eventually make your way back to Chengdu from there. There is even a direct bus linking Ganzi to Chengdu, though we wouldn’t recommend it.
Scenery Near Ganzi
Scenery Near Ganzi
  • This bus leaves Ganzi at 6.15 in the morning and takes 11 hours to get to Kanding, driving steadily and without any delays. However, once you get past Kanding,  night falls and road conditions worsen. We found ourselves driving down pitch-black windy mountain roads, overtaking vehicles on blind corners and going faster than even modern passenger cars. Terrified, we repeatedly shouted at the driver to slow down, to the amusement of the Chinese passengers, who didn’t seem to share our sense of doom.
Heading back to Manigango
Heading back to Manigango
  • Eventually, after 19 hours on the bus, the last 7 of which were extremely stressful, we pulled in at Chengdu bus station. If we ever had to do it again, we would definitely stop for the night in Kanding.

Update

  • The road between Kangding and Chengdu is now is much improved and the journey a breeze.

To Yushu / Serxu

Tibetan Lady At Serxu Monastery
Tibetan Lady At Serxu Monastery
  • Secondly, you can backtrack from Dege to Manigango and change buses, or go all the way to Ganzi if you want to be sure of a seat, or don’t fancy spending a night in Manigango.
Scenery Manigango to Yushu
Scenery Manigango to Yushu
  • Next you can head for Serxu, and then Yushu in Qinghai province. From there, you can make your way slowly to Xining, the capital of the province. There are some important monasteries close to Xining, such as Tongren and Ta Er Si, and the city is linked by rail to Lanzhou, the capital of Gansu province. The journey only takes 4 hours on a fast train.
Khampas near Litang
Khampas near Litang
  • Finally, you might want to continue your journey by moving into Yunnan province. In order to do this, you need to get back to Kanding first. From there, you make your way to Litang, then Xiangcheng – where you most likely will have to spend the night – and eventually Zhongdian in Yunnan.
View over Zhongdian old town before the fire Destroyed it
View over Zhongdian old town before fire destroyed it.

Back to Sichuan Province

Ganzi to Manigango and onto Dege

Ganzi 甘孜 to Manigango (Manigange 马尼干戈) and onto Dege 德格 Over the Chola Pass 雀儿山

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege

Ganzi to Manigango and onto Dege is a journey you will never forget. As the crow flies, it’s not that far from Ganzi to Dege, the last town before the Tibetan border and home to the famous Bakong Scripture Printing Lamasery. However, separating the two towns is the forbidding 5,400 meter Chola Pass 雀儿山, one of the highest roads in the world. 

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege

Setting off

Our bus set off more or less on time, and for the first couple of hours we crossed over grasslands, passing numerous villages and monastery towns. Some even had signs in English, welcoming visitors.

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege
Khampa Horseman

As we approached Manigango, after about two-and-a-half hours, the scenery became more dramatic and we could see Khampas on horse-back herding yaks, and nomad settlements dotting the pastures.

Chola Pass

Although horses are still the predominant means of transport for the Khampas, motorbikes are gaining in popularity, even out on these remote grasslands, judging by the number of bikes whizzing past the bus with two, three and even four people on them.

Nomads near Manigango

Welcome to Manigango

Passengers to Dege

On entering Manigango for our lunch break, the sky suddenly turned black and the heavens unleashed a tremendous downpour, which left the muddy streets even muddier.

Manigango Bus station

If any town ever looked like a Wild West one-street film set, then Manigango was it. For many Sichuanese, the name Manigango is associated with wild bandits robbing and even killing Chinese and Western tourists alike.

Main street Manigango

It does appear that until recently a problem of security did exist around these parts. However, on arriving there, the town seemed quiet enough.

Yaks and bus Manigango

In August 2004, Manigango had only one mucky street, and one vile public toilet, located in a crumbling wooden shack, just off the building site for a new hotel.

Loading the Bus to dege at Manigango

Its main purpose was to serve as a kind of transport hub for travellers changing buses for Dege and Chamdo in Tibet, or heading towards Serxu and then on to Yushu in Qinghai.

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege

There was quite a decent restaurant at the bus stop, with lots of boiling cauldrons, dishing out some rather tasty food. To get to the restaurant however, was another matter: passengers had to jump over puddles, avoid roaming yaks and run the gauntlet of an army of beggars that attached themselves to every incoming bus.

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege
Chola Pass

Next to the restaurant, another large hotel was under construction, most likely a sign of the times: Manigango seemed to be gearing up to becoming something of a tourist town.

Ganzi to Manigango and onto Dege

What’s more, it’s quite likely that it will succeed; the town may not be much, but the surrounding scenery is fantastic and a mere 20 kilometres away on the road to Dege is the Xinluhai lake, one of the most beautiful and pristine in China.

Xinhailu near Manigango
Sunny Xinluhai

For the time being, we were merely content to find something to eat, a place to pee – of sorts – and leave muddy  Manigango and its beggars behind.  The bus started to climb steadily over the grasslands, huge snow-capped mountains came into view and suddenly the Xinluhai lake appeared before us.

Ganzi to Manigango and onto  Dege
Xinhailu
A wet damp Xinluhai

The lake is set in alpine meadows, dotted with pine trees, that slope steeply towards the turquoise waters. On one side, there is a dramatic backdrop of threatening grey, jagged peaks and a glacier that comes all the way down.

Chola Pass from bus window

After the lake, the bus started the huge ascent up to the Chola Pass. Going up from Manigango is not so bad, as your bus is on the inside and you cannot see the precipice down below you. This is especially important when having to pass an oncoming truck, or overtake one that has broken down. Eventually, our packed bus crawled to the top, and all the Tibetans on board cheered and celebrated by throwing hundreds of paper prayers out of the window. We were ready to join them, having bought some in Ganzi for the occasion.

Other side of the Chola pass

Once the bus has made it over the pass, the rest of the journey is a piece of cake. We just rolled downhill for two hours, through deep pine valleys and following gushing mountain rivers until we pulled up at the crummy bus station in downtown Dege.

Returning back over the Chola Pass in sleet and snow was far worse!

Update

Five years later we came through Manigango again on our way from Yushu (just before the earthquake) to Ganzi. Somethings had improved. We overnighted at the Manigange Pani Hotel, then still the only option. Unfornutately, this was one of the worst nights of my life as I was suffering from servere Altitude Sickness that I had come down with in Yushu. These days there are other accommodation options in Manigango that might be better than Pani Hotel.

BACK TO SICHUAN PROVINCE

The Quaintest village In China? Hongcun

“Bu kaifa, bu kaifa 不开发” it hasn’t been developed for tourism. That was our driver’s favourite motto.
So he took us to the “bu kaifa” village of Hongcun 洪村

Ancient villages of Wuyuan,,One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)
洪村婺源

Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province).

The quaintest Village in China might be Hongcun 洪村. Hongcun, is surrounded by drop-dead gorgeous sub-tropical scenery. It is home to some wonderful Huizhou architecture and when we visited; no tourists

From the diary

Is this the quaintest village in China? After a copious and excellent lunch, which was at a restaurant opposite a huge ancient tree and seemed to be a favourite with tourist drivers, our man ( the driver) then took us to a remote and completely ‘undeveloped (bu kaifa 不开发)’ village called Hongcun  (not to be confused with its more famous namesake in Anhui near Huangshan), where there wasn’t an entrance ticket or single other tourist in sight.

Ancient villages of Wuyuan,,One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

The place was extremely pretty and peaceful: on the outside, a line of elegantly greying houses stood beside a clear river winding its way through the rice fields.

Ancient villages of Wuyuan, one of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

Stunning Hongcun Village Wuyuan

Contented-looking ducks floated on the water, bamboo poles loaded with washing swayed gently in the wind, while farmers in conical hats tended to their fields.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

In the narrow, shady streets towards the centre, local residents sat outside their doorways chatting, playing cards and cutting vegetables.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

We found some people busy restoring a spacious wooden community hall. In fact, in spite of its lack of (tourist) development,  the buildings in Hongcun were in remarkable shape and had some of the most intricate wooden carvings we’d come across.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

A Relaxing Afternoon in Stunning Hongcun village

We sat down on a stone bench in the shade of a drapping tree to enjoy a lukewarm beer, bought from a hole-in-the wall shop without a fridge, and let ourselves drift into the unhurried pace of village life.

Ancient villages of Wuyuan, One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

The locals, obviously not used to having foreigners in the village, eyed us up with friendly curiosity, often directing questions to our driver about who we were and what we were doing there.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province) Ancient villages of Wuyuan,

With the hearty lunch now weighing heavy on our stomachs, making us feel both comatose and soporific, we just let our driver exaggerate our importance to the villagers.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province) Ancient villages of Wuyuan,

We were now distinguished professors from a great overseas university and not merely humble English teachers from a university in Madrid; the locals seemed impressed and nodded approvingly at his every Word. Our driver was lapping it up!

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province) Ancient villages of Wuyuan,
Pity about the pipe ruining the photo

Normally, we would have underplayed our importance and protested our driver’s flattery, but we let it rest and everyone seemed contented. It was a perfect day and even the warm beer went down well!

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province) Ancient villages of Wuyuan,

Update: Hongcun has changed

As with everything in China in this century nothing withstands the changes of time and Hongcun is no exception. The village is now defiantly very Kaifa 不开发 (developed) for tourists. However, it is still beautiful and I am sure that on an off-peak day it can still be a lovely place to visit.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

Some of the buildings have undergone tasteful restoration and the ancestor halls and guild halls that were being used for weaving and chili drying are now housing museums and teahouses.

One of China's Most Stunning Villages: Hongcun 洪村 (Wuyuan 婺源, Jiangxi 江西省 Province)

Getting there and away:

Difficult when we visited. A hired car was the best option. Hongcun is located between Dazhang Mountain and Sixi and not too far from the famous Rainbow Bridge.

For more photos click on read more:

Continue reading “The Quaintest village In China? Hongcun”

Yancun Village: Wuyuan

Yancun Village Wuyuan Beautiful old Huizhou style houses
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

Yancun 延村 village Wuyuan 婺源 Jiangxi Province

Yancun village Wuyuan is remnant of an age of prosperity in this part of hidden China. Rich merchants who made fortunes in the big cities sent their money back to their ancestral villages to build stately homes in a style known as Huizhou Architecture. Yancun is one one of those villages.

A kilometre away from Cixi lies the village of Yancun, even less kaifa (developed) than Cixi, and with an equally impressive collection of buildings.

Beautiful old Huizhou style houses Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

Walking in Wuyuan

It’s a pleasant walk between the two villages (500 meters), either along the quiet road or through the rice fields. Interestingly, both villages have marked a walking route to allow the visitor to explore the best examples of Huizhou architecture.

Yancun Village Wuyuan Beautiful old Huizhou style houses
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

If you don’t wish to follow the routes it doesn’t really matter, as every turn of a corner and every side- alley provide a new voyage into time.

Beautiful old Huizhou style houses Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

Huizhou Style Architecture

Yancun is a compact village of Huizhou style architecture, a style that originated in neighbouring Anhui Province.

Yancun Village Wuyuan Beautiful old Huizhou style houses
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

The style and is characterized by two, sometimes three story buildings; depending on the wealth and ostentatiousness of the person who built them.  On the outside, the walls are white and the roofs black tiled with eaves.

Wicker basket making Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 weaving

Inside the buildings there is a hall /patio that usually has elaborately carved wooden frames hanging above it. Sometimes there is are more than one hall /patio.

Old streets Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 street scene

Life in Yancun

Yancun’s streets are a rabbit warren of narrow alleyways and passageways that entice the curious vistor to poke their noses around every corner.

Beautiful old Huizhou style houses Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 interior

Local residents didn’t seem fazed if you politely asked look around a private house and take a few snaps ( might have something to the money they receive from the entrance ticket to the Sixi 思系and Yancun 延村 scenic area).

Old Chinese kitchen
延村婺源江西省 old Kitchen

Yancun also offers the opportunity to come across still-in-use, ages old farm implements. These can be seen casually lying around on kitchen floors or hanging off living room walls. In the west, they would be expensive antiques sold in flea markets and rastros around Europe.

old chinese farm tools
延村婺源江西省 Farmer’s hat

Every available space on the streets is used for drying something, especially chilies, which are laid out in large flat wicker baskests while and huge gourds dangle everywhere above your head.

chilis and gourds  Yancun 延村
延村婺源江西省 drying Chilis

Besides the Huizhou houses, there are a least three famous ancestral halls in Yancun; the Congting Hall, Mingxun Hall and Yuqing Hall.

transporting beer in a cart
延村婺源江西省 Transporting beer

All of them were originally built in the 18th century. What you see now may not be the original structure, as they are reported to have undergone restoration and some rebuilding since then.

old baskets Yancun 延村
延村婺源江西省 Hanging Baskets

When we visited, some these ancestral halls were still being used as spaces for basket weaving and other farming related activities. Nowadays, the halls are a ‘must see’ for passing Chinese tour groups.

drying chilis Yancun 延村
延村婺源江西省 Drying chilis Yancun

The Mingxun hall has become a teahouse (not surprising given it was originally built by a tea merchant) and the Yuqing hall, has become a museum for antique furniture.

Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

However, the real charm in Yancun as mentioned at the beginning, is its idyll rural setting. Yancun is a village set up for gentle strolling and imbibing a fast disappearing way of life.

Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province
Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province
Yancun Village Wuyuan
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

Accomodation:

We stayed at a small family hotel on the edge of Cixi 思系, the only brick and white tile building around. At the front, there was an open-fronted grocery shop and a restaurant. The clean and simple rooms with bathroom and hot water (no towels or toiletries though, so be prepared) were in a new building at the back and cost 80 Yuan for a large double.

Beautiful old Huizhou style houses in the Villages of Wuyaun 婺源: Yancun 延村
延村婺源江西省 Yancun village Wuyuan Jiangxi Province

There were plenty of cheaper options in private houses in the village, and you can expect the offer to increase in the future. It is probably only a matter of time before some of those beautiful mansions will be converted into real hotels.

Wuyuan and around

In 2003 while killing time between classes, I lazily typed into Google “the most beautiful village in China” and up came a few entries, one of which was written by a local girl from a place called Wuyuan. In poor English she raved about the beautiful scenery in this remote area of Jiangxi province. The few photos that accompanied her article showed picturesque white villages of superb Huizhou Architecture and rolling green fields brightened by the stunning yellow of ripening rape seed.

Ancient Villages of Wuyuan
The undeveloped Village of Hongcun 洪村

In the next few weeks we will be uploading our photos of the villages in the Wuyuan area. We based ourselves in the bucolic and sleepy village of Sixi 思溪村 and spent several days hiking between villages and occasionally hiring a car to those village further afield.

Ancient Villages of Wuyuan
Basket Weavers at work in Yancun 延村

Among the villages we visited were the undiscovered gems of Yancun 延村 and Hongcun 洪村 (now both very much discovered) as well as more Kaifa 开发 / developed places such as Likeng 李坑 and Upper上 and Lower下 Xiaoqi 晓起.

Sixi ancient village wuyuan jiangxi China
The Yin Yang bridge in Sixi思溪村

Shunan Bamboo Sea: Taking a Chinese organised tour

At the Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海 we took our first organized Chinese tour since 1989. At first skeptical, we ended up having a marvelous day being led on long walks, carried over the forest on a cable car, rafting on a lake and being wined and dined on 16 different courses of bamboo food products. All led by a wonderful and enthusiastic guide.

Yibin Sichuan

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

To go on a tour or not

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海: taking a Chinese organised tour or should I go it alone ? There is really only one reason to stop at Yibin and that is to use it as a base to visit the fabulous Bamboo Sea some 70 kms away.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

To take a tour or not to take a tour

The first thing you have to decide is: do I visit the Bamboo Sea independently or do I join a tour. We doubted, wrung our hands, fretted and then the heavens opened and a twenty four hour torrential downpour insued; the matter was decided for us. We took a Chinese organsed tour for the first time and It was the best decision we could have taken.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Yibin 宜宾

Yibin is a modern city on the confluence of the Jinsha River 金沙江 and Min Rivers 岷江 where they combine to officially start the beginning of the Yangzi River 长江. There really isn’t anything to see, apart from the intense river traffic perhaps. Tourists tend to use Yibin as a base for a visit to the spectacular Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海 (or Forest as it is also known), about 70 kilometres away and the nearby historic riverside town of Lizhuang Ancient Town 李庄古镇.

Lizhuang Ancient town 李庄古镇
Lizhuang Ancient Town 李庄古镇 (not my photo)

Yibin also has the unenviable reputation of being the largest city in China with the least sunny days every year (we didn’t see the sun). Remember, this is where the Chinese idiom, 蜀犬吠日 (Shu quan fei ri) the Sichuan dog barks at the sun, originates; becuase it is something so unusual.

Yibin Gaoliang Baijiu wulianye
Wuliangye Baijiu Click here for webpage:https://www.wuliangye.be/history-of-wuliangye/

On the plus side it produces one of China’s best Baijiu 白酒 ( rice wine) Wuliangye 五粮液.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Shunan zhuhai 蜀南竹海, or the Bamboo Sea covers over 40 square kilometres of mountains and valleys. The landscape is absolutely incredible: narrow paths will take you deep into a dense sea of vegetation, dominated by many different species of bamboo, some of which reaching heights of over 10 metres.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

The dense fog that often descends upon the forest contributes to the magic and enchanted atmosphere. Besides the bamboo, there are many waterfalls, temples, sculptures and reliefs in the rock walls to entertain the visitors.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

The cable Car

A ride in the cable car is a must; it’s a 30 minute ride during which you follow the side of the mountain up and down, at times almost touching the tree tops, at times sailing high above the undulating sea of bamboo. When the cabin reaches a peak, a valley completely covered in bamboo stretches out in front of you, for as far as the eye can see.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

It’s the typical landscape immortalised in famous martial arts films such as ‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon’ or ‘The House of the Flying Daggers’, many scenes of which were shot around here. The famous fighting scene in the ‘Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon’ where the protagonists fight on the tops of bamboo trees was filmed here.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Organising a Chinese tour

Normally, we are not really into guided tours, but in the case of the Bamboo Sea we had a great time. You can try and hire a taxi to get there, but the distances are quite large, both getting there and back and inside the park, plus it isn’t that easy to find your way around and visit the best places.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Our tour was organised by the travel agency inside our hotel, the Xufu Binguan. At first they were a bit reluctant to take us, but when they realised we could speak Chinese, our money was happily accepted. We were in good company, a group of young enthusiastic engineering students from Panzhihua 攀枝花 on the Sichuan – Yunnan border, led by a lively and dynamic female guide. She took us to different areas of the park, by bus, on foot, by cable car and finally rafting.

Sichuan dialect rap
Sichuan Dialect Rap and Hip Hop

The bus driver, a young and jolly chap, played Sichuan dialect Hip Hop and Rap that had our fellow companions falling on the floor with laughter. The driver later helped us buy the DVD in on arrival back in Yibin.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

The Food

We also had the opportunity to taste 16 different dishes made of/with bamboo, including the famous and expensive bamboo eggs (which are really rounded wild mushrooms that grow underneath the bamboo trees). It was really delicious. The meal wasn’t included in the tour. We got together with members of the group, negociated a price for 16 dishes, and then split the bill.

Bamboo dishes Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Yibin 宜宾 practicalities:

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Where to Stay and Eat:

The Xufu Binguan 叙府宾馆 in the centre of town is a good option. Spotless modern doubles with a good breakfast are 200 Yuan. There is a wide variety of decent restaurants and supermarkets near the hotel.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Coming and Going:

Update:

New high speed trains from Chengdu take just one and a half hours to arrive in Yibin and pass through Leshan. The line opend on 2019 and also connects Yibin to Guiyang in Guizhou province.

Chinese high speed trains
China’s high speed trains

Bus:

From the chaotic main bus station, Beimen北门, there are regular departures to almost all import destinations in the region, though most buses will go through Zigong first.

Update

Nowadays, a network of highways links all the major cities making travel much easier than when we were there in 2005.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Boat services to Leshan appeared to have been discontinued. Some services to Chongqing still seemed to run, though we were unable to confirm this.

Visiting the Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海 if not taking a tour:

Rock carvings Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

Nan’an station, 15 minutes from the centre on the other side of the river, offers irregular services to Shunnan 蜀南竹海 / the Bamboo Sea, most of them with a changeover in Changning 长宁.

Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海

The two main villages inside the park are called Wanling 万岭 and Wanli 万里. Both villages, as well as some other strategic locations inside the park, offer accommodation – with a typical double room costing around 100 Yuan – as well as food for those visitors who wish to stay the night.

Traditional Sichuan houses Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海
Shunan Bamboo Sea 蜀南竹海 Traditional Sicuan buildings near Yibin 宜宾

Guiyang贵阳 – Chishui 赤水-Zigong自贡 – Yibin 宜宾 –Leshan 乐山– Chengdu 成都: 2005 Route.

In 2005 our visit to the Bamboo Sea was part of a facinating trip from Guiyang to Chengdu via Chishui.

Giant ferns Chishui
Giant Ferns Chishui 赤水

To get to Leshan 乐山 we first had to backtrack to Zigong; all in all quite a tiring ride of over 6 hours, due to the fact that the motorway has not reached this part of Sichuan yet. This has all changed now see above.

Zigong guild hall
Guildhall Zigong 子宫

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